EXPLAINING OLD ENGLISH MONEY, PRE-DECIMAL.

NAMES FOR PRE-DECIMAL CURRENCY


The many names used for pre-decimal currency can be confusing. The basic pound that was in use prior to 1971 was nicknamed a 'quid’ and existed as a paper note. The sovereign issued was also a pound in denomination, but the actual gold bullion content was worth far more.

Prior to 1800, gold guineas were in use which was equivalent to £1-1s, i.e. 21 Shillings. A guinea was considered a more gentlemanly amount than a pound. Half-guineas and third-guineas, the latter equal to 7 shillings, were also in use.

In addition, there were also denominations known as groats. A groat was worth fourpence and a half-groat, twopence. Other nicknames for coins abounded: earlier silver threepences were known as ‘Joeys', whereas pennies were referred to as ‘coppers’ - because prior to 1860 these were made entirely from copper.

PLEASE SEE COIN TYPES AND WEIGHTS FOR MORE INFORMATION


pre decimal english money